De-risking Resilience

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De-risking Resilience

State Active
Duration 2019 – 2024
Budget / Funding $798,000
Project Leader(s)
Iain White
University of Waikato
Sarah Beaven
University of Canterbury

Vision

A decision-making environment for Aotearoa New Zealand that acknowledges that acting on science is sometimes difficult and many resilience decisions present significant political, professional, or institutional risks.

Project description

Currently, decision-makers have to mediate considerable institutional, professional, and political risks that arise from mitigating natural hazards, such as how sure are we? How much will it cost? Who pays? What should we prioritise?

Some of these risks can be addressed by better science, or more accurate data, but where situations are complex, uncertain, and value-laden, action is difficult and natural hazard risks may be transferred to the state and private sector, or to people, places, and future generations.

We are working to build understanding of the real-world ‘risks’ of decision making and so increase the potential of resilience science, tools, and policies from multiple areas across the challenge to have real-world impact. Our research is being conducted in two workstreams:

  • In the Innovating Resilience workstream we aim to deepen the understanding of the science-policy-practice interface in Aotearoa New Zealand. We are working on case studies with central and local government stakeholders, focusing on issues such as sea-level rise and managed retreat, and testing a range of innovations and approaches to reduce the gap between resilience science and societal action.
  • In the Incentivising Resilience workstream, we are exploring new ways to motivate and incentivise resilient behaviours in the context of uncertainty and multiple hazards. We are researching the economics of climate change adaptation, the economic impacts of natural hazards, and the financial instruments (such as insurance) that can be used to incentivise resilience.

Our goal is to help enable more difficult decisions to be taken, particularly those that bring considerable institutional, professional, economic and political risks for those making them.

Resource Outputs from this project

Article

Defining Build-Back-Better after Disasters with an Example: Sri Lanka’s Recovery after the 2004 Tsunami.

Noy I, De Alwis D, Ferrarini B, Park D. 2020. Defining build-back-better after disasters with an example: Sri Lanka's recovery after the 2004 Tsunami. International…

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Article

Retrofitting an emergency approach to the climate emergency: A study of two climate emergency declarations in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Nissen S, Cretney R. Retrofitting an emergency approach to the climate crisis: A study of two climate emergency declarations in Aotearoa New Zealand. Environment and…

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Article

Managed retreats by whom and how? Identifying and delineating governance modalities

Christina Hanna, Iain White, Bruce C. Glavovic, Managed retreats by whom and how? Identifying and delineating governance modalities, Climate Risk Management, Volume 31, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crm.2021.100278

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Article

Wellbeing after a managed retreat: Observations from a large New Zealand program

Hoang T, Noy I. 2020. Wellbeing after a managed retreat: Observations from a large New Zealand program. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction. 48:101589. doi:10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101589.

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Article

Resilience and housing markets: Who is it really for

Squires G, White I. 2019. Resilience and housing markets: who is it really for? Land Use Policy. 81:167-174. doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2018.10.018.

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Article

Bloated bodies and broken bricks: Power, ecology, and inequality in the political economy of natural disaster recovery

Sovacool BK, Tan-Mullins M, Abrahamse W. 2018. Bloated bodies and broken bricks: power, ecology, and inequality in the political economy of natural disaster recovery. World…

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Article

Regressivity in Public Natural Hazard Insurance: a Quantitative Analysis of the New Zealand Case

Owen S, Noy I. 2019. Regressivity in public natural hazard insurance: a quantitative analysis of the New Zealand case. Economics of Disasters and Climate Change.…

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Article

Earthquake-induced transportation disruption and economic performance: The experience of Christchurch, New Zealand

Yonson R, Noy I, Ivory VC, Bowie C. 2020. Earthquake-induced transportation disruption and economic performance: the experience of Christchurch, New Zealand. Journal of Transport Geography.…

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Article

Insurance as a Double-Edged Sword: Quantitative Evidence from the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake.

Poontirakul P, Brown C, Seville E, Vargo J, Noy I. 2017. Insurance as a double-edged sword: quantitative evidence from the 2011 Christchurch earthquake. The Geneva…

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Article

Earthquake‐strengthening policy for commercial buildings in small‐town New Zealand

Filippova O, Noy I. 2020. Earthquake-strengthening policy for commercial buildings in small-town New Zealand. Disasters. 44(1):179-204. doi:10.1111/disa.12360.

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Article

Who cares? Future sea-level-rise and house prices

Filippova O, Nguyen C, Noy I, Rehm M. 2020. Who cares? Future sea level rise and house prices. Land Economics. 96(2):207-224. doi:10.3368/le.96.2.207

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Article

Measuring the Economic Risk of COVID-19 in Developing Countries: Where is it Higher?

Noy I, Doan N, Ferrarini B, Park D. 2020. The economic risk of COVID-19 in developing countries: where is it highest? In: Djankov S, Panizza…

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